Art, Craft & Design

Course description 

Through our Art lessons, we aim to provide all learners with the knowledge and competencies needed to appreciate the world around them, understand a variety of artistic ways of working, be creative and independent, whilst also giving them the tools to successfully represent their world and views in a variety of media and be proud of their achievements.

Underpinned by research into children’s cognitive and artistic development, the curriculum has been planned and sequenced to allow learners to be challenged, knowing more and remembering more by revisiting themes and technical skills throughout each key stage, culminating in the ability to make informed and effective choices about their own Art making.

Schemes of Learning have been developed that fully utilise both traditional and contemporary art competencies, developing students’ understanding of Art’s role throughout history, culture and the wealth of the nation.

We know that a high quality Art, Craft and Design education will engage, inspire and challenge students, equipping them with the knowledge and skills to participate in, experiment with, invent and create their own works of art.

Key Stage 3

Each year contains three projects, through which students will cover different aspects of Art. They will experience drawing, painting and ceramics whilst building on the skills and techniques required to develop their knowledge and understanding of Art. Each lesson at Key Stage 3 is designed to contain a sequence of activities with related outcomes and keywords. Teacher assessment will continue throughout the project and a summative assessment will take place at the end of each project.

Year 7

Autumn Term: Landscapes

Picking them up from the drawing stage they enter the Academy with, students create an imagined landscape as the base for further work. Looking at how artists use perspective and grounds in landscape art, they revisit their early drawings, practising transfer skills and building dexterity. Inspired by the work of Hundertwasser, Afremov and Webster we then together explore line, tone and simple colour theory. Students complete their final piece and learn how to evaluate it.

Spring Term: Self Image

Students look at the meaning of portrait and likeness and the idea of simplification and exaggeration. They are introduced to the concept of analytical writing and describe and interpret the work of Julian Opie. Picking up pencil skills from the previous project and building on transfer techniques, students create their own portraits in drawing and collage. Applying colour theories from last term, and learning new painting techniques, they then create their own final piece before evaluating it.

Summer Term: Insects

This project draws students’ attention to the beauty of our world as well as asking questions about ownership and the purpose of Art. We start by looking at mark making techniques and get inspired by Kutcher’s work, which we also learn to write a full critical analysis on. Using photos of insects, we create observational drawings in different media. We explore patterns, surfaces and how these can be translated into 3D. After a clay techniques workshop we create a final piece of an abstract clay tile which is part of a collaborative piece of Art.

Year 8      

Autumn Term: Insects

(Students could not experience this clay project at the end of Year 7 as we went into the first national lockdown. To give them experience of this valid 3D technique, this project has now been brought into Year 8 for them.)

This project draws students’ attention to the beauty of our world as well as asking questions about ownership and the purpose of Art. We start by looking at mark making techniques and get inspired by Kutcher’s work which we also learn to write a full critical analysis on. Using photos of insects, we create observational drawings in different media. We explore patterns, surfaces, and how these can be translated into 3D. After a clay techniques workshop we create a final piece of an abstract clay tile which is part of a collaborative piece of Art.

Spring Term: Everyday Pops

Everyday Pops is designed to build on the Fine Art drawing skills students have encountered in previous projects and to develop these further, introducing techniques like the grid method and scaling work, and how to create emphasis. These techniques are then used to make everyday items aesthetically pleasing, a work of Art. This also teaches learners to appreciate the world around them and look for the beauty within.

Summer Term: Movement

In this project, students explore the concepts of movement through abstraction. The art movement Futurism and the work of Giulio d’Anna serve as inspiration for students’ own work. Students look at body movement and sportspeople before exploring techniques of drawing, transfer, polystyrene printing and reduction print. We then explore how to use prints to develop work even further by creating collages and looking closely at composition.

Year 9

Autumn Term: Events & Views

In Events & Views we look at political art and how artists throughout the history of time have tried to influence viewers or bring messages across. Exploring the history of graffiti and the question what makes art art, we look at Shepard Fairy’s work, explore how artists combine images and text, before looking at important happenings and people in the world right now. Students create a piece of political art, combining drawing and collage techniques, writing, and stencilled portraits.

Spring Term: Masks

In Masks, students learn how art has played a role in religious and traditional events throughout history and around the world. Through an exploration of various types of masks, students learn about the varieties of representation of facial features and challenge their views about proportion. Students investigate visual prompts through drawings and learn how to communicate intended designs before creating their work in clay and painting outcomes.

Summer Term: In the Sea

The project In the Sea draws students’ attention to the beauty of our world as well as the dangers it faces and how artists represent both concepts. Students practise primary observation skills before completing a lino print which builds on the knife skills learnt in the Autumn Term. This Project is designed to form a natural link to the first project, Natural Form, in Year 10 for those students who have chosen to carry on with the study of Art.

Key Stage 4 

At Key Stage 4, students will build on their technical skills learnt in Key Stage 3, whilst gaining confidence in their own ability and gaining independence. Students will have time to create sustained pieces of work in a variety of media. Students regularly work from observational drawing studies within their projects in order to maintain and improve drawing skills. They learn about keywords and specific skills needed to develop a variety of practical techniques. Students learn how to produce in depth critical analysis of art work for a greater understanding and begin to select artists of interest. The final project is set externally and formulates 40% of the final grade. This results in a ten-hour practical exam.

Year 10: Natural Form

In the first term, using the topic of Natural Form, students create a variety of outcomes that are still teacher-led, focussing on building up practical skills. Towards the end of the first term, the goal then is to teach students how to build their own part of a portfolio leading the students towards more independence, resulting in the students taking ownership of the last part of the project, creating individual pieces by February half-term.

Year 10: Identity

Starting half-way through the Spring Term, our Identity Project is designed to offer an outlet as well as an insight into how others view their identity and depict this artistically. Work becomes more thoughtful, independent, and analytical writing is developed further, allowing students to connect with work on a more meaningful level.

Year 11: Identity

Due to the interruption to the Spring and Summer Term in 2020, the government changed the course outline for the current Year 11 cohort by removing the exam element. Hence, students utilise the time to personalise their portfolio, creating individual pieces of work that are inspired by artists of their own choice. Students will also have time to go back into their Natural Forms portfolio, completing and adding pieces of work, so that by the end of the course every student has two distinct portfolios of work.

Homework 

Key Stage 3 students receive approximately an hour per fortnight or half an hour per lesson (variable depending on the task).

Key Stage 4 students receive between two and three hours homework each week (variable depending on the task).

Books, Equipment, Materials and Resources Recommended/Needed 

Key Stage 3 students are provided with A4 sketch books for the duration of their studies.

Key Stage 4 students are expected to purchase their sketch books. They can buy these books through the Art department. These books vary in size and paper and are priced accordingly.

All students are expected to arrive at every lesson with the basic stationery equipment. However, some students find that pencil crayons and felt tips are helpful. At Key Stage 4, we provide students with a shopping list in which the most beneficial equipment is identified.

Opportunities for Study Beyond Key Stage 4 

Art and photography at A-Level or BTEC make a great choice post-16. Other subjects can include, at AS and /or A2 , Textiles, Graphics, Three-dimensional studies. A Foundation course in Art and Design leads to a specialist degree course at Art College or University.

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